Live Blogging: The Daring Bakers Make Lavash

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Andrea's Recipes - lavash with roasted tomatillo jalapeno and avocado salsa

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Today is posting day for the monthly Daring Bakers challenge, and I’m live blogging the challenge. This month our hosts Shel of Musings from the Fish Bowl and Natalie of Gluten A Go Go chose an alternative challenge for us: vegan and/or gluten-free lavash crackers from Peter Reinhart’s The Bread Baker’s Apprentice with vegan and gluten-free dips.

Because crackers and dips are a match made in heaven, the challenge calls for both. I chose to make a roasted tomatillo jalapeno and avocado salsa using the fresh tomatillos and jalapenos from our garden. The flavors worked perfectly with the cumin seed lavash, and it’s a combination we will certainly make again.

Andrea's Recipes - roasted tomatillo jalapeno and avocado salsa with lavash

I chose to make two batches of lavash, one according to the challenge instructions and the other with a 50-50 mix of bread flour and whole wheat flour. Of the two, we preferred the flavor of the whole wheat lavash.

Step 1: Mixing

Andrea's Recipes - mixing whole wheat lavash dough

Andrea's Recipes - mixing lavash dough

Step 2: Kneading

Andrea's Recipes - kneading the lavash

Andrea's Recipes - whole wheat lavash, kneaded

Step 3: Rising

The house is a little cool today, so I’ve put them in the oven with the light on. They will rise for about 90 minutes. The recipe calls for 60 to 90 minutes, but I anticipate needing the full rising time due to the weather.

Andrea's Recipes - rising lavash in the oven

Step 4: Prepare the Toppings

These will top the crackers. Clockwise from the top: coarse sea salt, cinnamon sugar, black sesame seeds, white sesame seeds, poppy seeds, (center) cumin seeds.

Andrea's Recipes - seeds for lavash

Andrea's Recipes - closeup of seeds for lavash

Step 5: Roll and Rest

Andrea's Recipes - whole wheat dough for lavash, risen and divided

Andrea's Recipes - dough for lavash, rolled

Step 6: Cut and Sprinkle

Andrea's Recipes - dough for lavash, sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar

Andrea's Recipes - whole wheat lavash dough, sprinkled with cumin and coarse sea salt

Step 7: Bake

Andrea's Recipes - lavash with poppy and sesame seeds

A big thanks to Shel of Musings from the Fish Bowl and Natalie of Gluten A Go Go for choosing our delicious and fun challenge! To see all of the crispy lavash, visit The Daring Bakers Blogroll.

Previous Yeasty Daring Bakers Challenges

Daring Bakers logoEquipment

medium mixing bowl or stand mixer with dough hook attachment
baking sheet lined with parchment or a silicone baking mat
rolling pin

Ingredients

LAVASH
1-1/2 cups (6.75 oz) unbleached bread flour or gluten free flour blend (If you use a blend without xanthan gum, add 1 tsp xanthan or guar gum to the recipe.) I used a 50-50 mix of unbleached bread flour and whole wheat flour.
1/2 teaspoon (.13 oz) salt
1/2 teaspoon (.055 oz) instant yeast
1 tablespoon (.75 oz) agave syrup or sugar (I used maple syrup.)
1 tablespoon (.5 oz) vegetable oil
1/3 to 1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons (3 to 4 oz) water, at room temperature
Poppy seeds, sesame seeds, paprika, cumin seeds, caraway seeds, or kosher salt for toppings

VEGAN DIPS
roasted tomatillo jalapeno salsa with avocado (recipe coming on Monday Tuesday)
guacamole
hummus bi tahini
sun-dried tomato tapenade

Andrea's Recipes - lavash with roasted tomatillo jalapeno and avocado salsa

Preparation

1. In a mixing bowl, stir together the flour, salt yeast, agave, oil, and just enough water to bring everything together into a ball.  You may not need the full 1/2 cup + 2 Tb of water, but be prepared to use it all if needed.

2. Sprinkle some flour on the counter and transfer the dough to the counter.  Knead for about 10 minutes, or until the ingredients are evenly distributed.  The dough should pass the windowpane test (see http://www.wikihow.com/Determine-if-Bre … ong-Enough for a description of this) and register 77 degrees to 81 degrees Fahrenheit. The dough should be firmer than French bread dough, but not quite as firm as bagel dough (what I call medium-firm dough), satiny to the touch, not tacky, and supple enough to stretch when pulled.  Lightly oil a bowl and transfer the dough to the bowl, rolling it around to coat it with oil.  Cover the bowl with plastic wrap.

3. Ferment at room temperature for 90 minutes, or until the dough doubles in size. (You can also retard the dough overnight in the refrigerator immediately after kneading or mixing).

4.  Mist the counter lightly with spray oil and transfer the dough to the counter.  Press the dough into a square with your hand and dust the top of the dough lightly with flour.  Roll it out with a rolling pin into a paper thin sheet about 15 inches by 12 inches.  You may have to stop from time to time so that the gluten can relax.  At these times, lift the dough from the counter and wave it a little, and then lay it back down.  Cover it with a towel or plastic wrap while it relaxes.  When it is the desired thinness, let the dough relax for 5 minutes.  Line a sheet pan with baking parchment.  Carefully lift the sheet of dough and lay it on the parchment.  If it overlaps the edge of the pan, snip off the excess with scissors.

5. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit with the oven rack on the middle shelf.  Mist the top of the dough with water and sprinkle a covering of seeds or spices on the dough (such as alternating rows of poppy seeds, sesame seeds, paprika, cumin seeds, caraway seeds, kosher or pretzel salt, etc.)  Be careful with spices and salt – a little goes a long way. If you want to precut the cracker, use a pizza cutter (rolling blade) and cut diamonds or rectangles in the dough.  You do not need to separate the pieces, as they will snap apart after baking.  If you want to make shards, bake the sheet of dough without cutting it first.

6.  Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the crackers begin to brown evenly across the top. The time will depend on how thinly and evenly you rolled the dough). Mine took a little longer.

7.  When the crackers are baked, remove the pan from the oven and let them cool in the pan for about 10 minutes.  You can then snap them apart or snap off shards and serve.

Preparation – Gluten Free

1. In a mixing bowl, stir together the flour, salt yeast, agave, oil, and just enough water to bring everything together into a ball.  You may not need the full 1/2 cup + 2 Tb of water, but be prepared to use it all if needed.

2. The dough should be firmer than French bread dough, but not quite as firm as bagel dough (what I call medium-firm dough), and slightly tacky. Lightly oil a bowl and transfer the dough to the bowl, rolling it around to coat it with oil.  Cover the bowl with plastic wrap.

3. Ferment at room temperature for 90 minutes, or until the dough doubles in size. (You can also retard the dough overnight in the refrigerator immediately after kneading or mixing).

4. Lay out two sheets of parchment paper.  Divide the cracker dough in half and then sandwich the dough between the two sheets of parchment.  Roll out the dough until it is a paper thin sheet about 15 inches by 12 inches.  Slowly peel away the top layer of parchment paper.  Then set the bottom layer of parchment paper with the cracker dough on it onto a baking sheet.

5. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit with the oven rack on the middle shelf.  Mist the top of the dough with water and sprinkle a covering of seeds or spices on the dough (such as alternating rows of poppy seeds, sesame seeds, paprika, cumin seeds, caraway seeds, kosher or pretzel salt, etc.)  Be careful with spices and salt – a little goes a long way. If you want to precut the cracker, use a pizza cutter (rolling blade) and cut diamonds or rectangles in the dough.  You do not need to separate the pieces, as they will snap apart after baking.  If you want to make shards, bake the sheet of dough without cutting it first.

6.  Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the crackers begin to brown evenly across the top (the time will depend on how thinly and evenly you rolled the dough).

7.  When the crackers are baked, remove the pan from the oven and let them cool in the pan for about 10 minutes.  You can then snap them apart or snap off shards and serve.

************************************************************

Source: adapted from The Bread Baker’s Apprentice, by Peter Reinhart

[An original post from Andrea Meyers: making life delicious. All images and text copyrighted, All Rights Reserved.]

[Disclosure: This blog earns a few cents on items purchased through the Amazon.com links in posts.]

Comments

  1. says

    I love the live blogging. How fun. Makes me want to run to the kitchen and make them with you. :) I’ll stay tuned through out the time to see your crackers.

  2. D Wilson says

    “The house is a little cool today,”… You have no idea how much I’d love to be able to type those words. Here in Central Texas it was cool(er) outside this morning – mid 60s. Already climbed twenty degrees however and it isn’t noon yet.

    Have fun with the lavash. We enjoyed that for the first time on vacation in Hawaii years go. It is just the ticket for dips and I look forward to reading all your recipes.

  3. says

    I love the live blogging — what a great idea. My computer’s upstairs now, so I’d certainly get a workout doing this. On second thought, that’s not such a bad idea. I left my dough at room temp over night covered with plastic — cool here, too. I could tell it wouldn’t be rising that much. Still working on my post…be back later :)

    kellypeas last blog post..Apple Walnut Cupcakes with Cream Cheese Frosting

  4. says

    Andrea I’m holding my breath for this roasted tomatillo jalapeno salsa with avocado dip! Wow! I can’t get all the goodies from my garden but oh does that look and sound wonderful!
    Excellent crackers!

  5. says

    Hmm – this looks great, but this is not lavash as I know it. Which is not to say that there’s no kind of lavash that looks like what you made – but the lavash I grew up with in Azerbaijan is very thin, very soft and pliable tortilla-like bread (but much thinner) – it’s almost paper thin, and is used exclusively for wraps. I actually was going to make some today, though myself I have trouble rolling it out to adequate thinness.

  6. janet says

    Sofya, I am looking for a “soft” lavash recipe, would you consider sending one, so far every one I have seen is for Lavash crackers, which look great but they just aren’t want I’m looking for. You could email me if you like.

    janetlgreen@roadrunner.com

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